The Monthly Film Festival-Review (UK)

Trailer front pic

We are still a “work in progress” in post-production for Vancouver Rhapsody, but The Monthly Film Festival kindly gave us a review for the movie. We were the review of the day for July 1st, 2016. Thanks, UK, and Happy Canada Day!!! You can read the review below, or go directly to the following link: http://tmff.net/reviews/vancouver-rhapsody/

“From the beginning we have to mention that at the moment we received this feature film, the sound editing was not done and we had to deal with some raw material. We will try to write about this movie as a whole and we will also try not to be backtracked by this version.

In ‘Vancouver Rhapsody’, Betty Jiang juggled with the subject and the cinematic techniques only to create a fresh movie that intrigues. The plot is relatively simple: a newly engaged couple, Sandra and Leo, unconsciously said their ex lovers names whilst lovemaking. The best way to get over this is to propose a first degree encounter with them only to officially leave things apart. And yes, the plot has some surprises one may not expect to see, but they are welcomed in this context.

Making full use of consciousness and also creating the characters oddly conscious is something very rare and hard to do in movies. Also, highlighting a wide range of feelings towards other people is way too naturalistic for a movie where only parts of the human behaviour should be exploited. The remorse, the second thoughts – those are the keys of a movie like this one, where you don’t have to search for answers in any place but in the person that asks the question.

From a technical perspective, this feature was nicely created, but for us, the sound issue wasn’t something easy to take. Truth be told, the soundtrack is nice and fits the mood of the scenes; also, the cinematography is good, with a few flaws, but there are things that could be improved. The shadow-light ratio sometimes (in small sequences) seems unbalanced, but this is a minor issue. Also, Betty Jiang had a wonderful idea with the black and white insertions that give a little more class to the movie. The main focus of the film is on the dinner table – the characters act like a bunch of predators waiting for the prey to make a bad move. The tension is visible and for the viewer, this is vital. Every move they make can be read through a psychological code, and every sentence they say takes the characters on a new minefield, unexplored since. This movie also has an educational side that we found and we would like to share with you – if you don’t what (name) to say, you should say nothing more at all.” – July 1 2016

 

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